Learning Expeditions in Israël

After having an opportunity to go in Israël for a first learning expedition in 2015, i went back last july (2019). Israël is known to be one of the best startup nation. I am going to share with you my experiences: one in the field computer science and the other in cybersecurity.

SheCodes, Tel Aviv (2015)

SheCodes @ Campus Tel Aviv

The first time i went in Israël i was able to attend one of SheCodes meetup. They presented the different workshops: from basics of web programming to more advanced programming. In these workshops everyone is welcome no matter which level. You will get to learn by doing and be able to ask questions to other attendes or to the mentors.

If you have the opportunity to attend an event made by SheCodes, you definitely should do it, and if you live in Israël you should attend all of them. Since 2015 they even grew they are not only in Tel Aviv anymore but also in Jerusalem, Herzliya, Netanya, … Click here to get more info on their website.

Technion University (2015)

Technion, Dream it. Do it

During this learning expedition, i scheduled a visit of Technion University. If you want to do the same, you will have to contact them and provide them a short bio and a brief explanation of why you want to visit. Then, they will help you schedule a guided tour of the University.

Technion is among the world top ten science and technology research University. You can read the full history of this University here. Also, by going to Technion you will have the opportunity to visit the breath taking city of Haifa. Why not taking a snack break at Fattoush?

Fattoush restaurant

After this go and chill out at Bahaï gardens!

View of Bahaïa gardens

BSides Tel Aviv 2019

BSides TLV 2019

Workshop – Ethical Hacking 101 (July 2019)

For the first day of the Cyber Week of Tel Aviv I attended a workshop hosted by BSides Tel Aviv: Ethical Hacking 101 by Telspace Systems.

After a brief introduction on Ethical Hacking, we were able to practice a little. We used different scanners and tools. There were different environments set up just for us to hack them. We got the opportunity to practice SQL injections, vulnerability scanning, vulnerability exploitations. We saw the full process of pentesting, from looking for vulnerabilities to exploiting them with tips and tricks to stay stealthy while doing so. They also presented a very useful tool, really worth mentioning here: CherryTree. With this you can take notes about your process, this will make the pentest report easier to produce in the end.

This class was an awesome introduction to ethical hacking. The instructors were very clear and passionate. If you have the opportunity to attend a BSides meetup you should totally do it.

Talks

The day after the workshops, BSides had organized different talks. They were presented by Keren Elazari, Security Analyst, Author and TED Speaker. There was also a special tent for BSides where you could see their partners. There was an area if you were looking for a job and one just to chill out. I need to add a special mention to the decorations of the stage and the posters. They were awesome! You can see the picture below.

Eva Galperin: Where do we go from here, fighting Spouseware and Stalkerware

Eva Galperin is Director of Cybersecurity at the Electronic Frontier Foundation.

The main points in her talks were the following:

  • Stalkerware and Spouseware are not detected by anti-virus
  • She conviced Kaspersky to help with the detection of those apps and take privacey seriously
  • The tools to fight against this exist
  • Laws that already exist need to be enforced
  • She is shouting out for people to talk about this.

If you scroll down you will find in the « To go further » section a link to a video of her talk.

Amichai Shulman and Yuval Ron: Alexa and Cortana in Windowsland

They presented different vulnerabilities they found in Cortana and Alexa on windows operated devices.

In the « To go further section » you will find the youtube Channel of Yuval Ron in which you can find some demos.

Sofia Belikovetsky: The Butterfly Effect Actively manipulating VW through hypervisor introspection

Sofia Belikovetsky took the challenge to create a virtual router in order to find anomalies in the network. In this talk she explained how she proceeded to do this: How she was able to find what was going on in the VMs from the outside (from a list of running processes to a monitor of every new processes).

Tomer Zait and Nimrod Levy: ReDTunnel, Explore Internal Networks via DNS Rebinding Tunnel

Tomer Zait and Nimrod Levy presented ReDTunnel how it works and why they created it. In the « To go further » section you will find a link to ReDTunnel Github, why not contribute?

Yossi Sassi: PowerShell as a Hacking Tool

Yossi Sassi shared many tips to get the best of PowerShell as a hacking tool. In the « To go further » section you can find a link to his slides and… a link to Yossi Sassi & The Oriental Rock Ochestra.

Omri Misgav: Bypassing user-mode hooks 101

Omri Misgav is the team leader of the security research team of Ensilo. In this talk he explained hooking and user-mode hooks.

Yaron King: Low hanging (blue) fruit, Hacking and defending yourself using open-source tools

Yaron King explained how he got confronted to password spraying and what he did about it.

Eyal Itkin: Karta Source code assisted Geographic-based binary matching

Eyal Itkin is a vulnerability researcher at Check Point Research. In this talk he explained how Karta works. In the « To go further » section you can find Karta Source code.

Danny Grander and Yuval Ofir from Pasten CTF Team: Capture the Flag

In their talk Danny Grander and Yuval Ofir explained what a CTF is and their experience with them. They also presented how they resolve hard challenges.

Other events of the Cyberweek 2019 in Tel Aviv

Besides BSides (yeah i know xD ), there were plenty of events during the cyberweek. I went to some of them that i will present here.

Women in Cybersecurity: How to attract more diverse talent

Leading Cyber ladies invited inspiring women in. Firstly, Keren Elazari interviewed some of them. They shared their experience and gave some advices :

  • Hila Meller, VP Security Europe British Telecom. Her advice: if you want it don’t let anyone stop you. Believe in yourself
  • Helen Dixon, Comissioner, DataProtection Comission, Ireland. Her advice: Don’t listen to any advice you are perfect as you are
  • Maria Thompson, Chief Risk Officer State of North Carolina. Her advice: Learn foundations of IT if you are able to achieve and do that you will be more successful.

After those interview Eva Galperin, Director of Cybersecurity and Head of Threat Lab, Electronic Frontier Foundation, presented herself and her career in a brief talk.

Finally, there was a panel moderated by Reut Menashe, co founder of BSides TLV.

Each person from the panel presented their background. Then they shared what and why in their opinion companies should do more to attract more talent.

  • For Limor Kessem, mono culture has a bad effect. She also said that there is an impact on diversity with the « bring a friend policy ». In fact, with this kind of policy companies tend to hire the same kind of people.
  • For Mary McGinley, companies need to have an extremly diverse team to see all aspects of a problem. She reminded the study that said that women won’t apply to a job if they do not fit 100% of the criterias. She advises that even if many people tell you that you should not apply, apply anyway. She added « do something you love and make it work for yourself ».
  • Karine Ben-Simhon, said that it’s important to encourage private and public sector to make equal opportunities. She also said that there is also a problem with women because most of HR staff are women.
  • For Moran Weber, the best way to make a difference is by combining top down and bottom up approach. It’s also important to revise the job description and understand why women don’t apply. In her opinion those descriptions should avoid terms like « ninja code », « superstar », « rockstar », etc. She shared that her best decision was to start putting herself out there and to decide that her imposter syndrom would not decide for her. She used it to help her learn more.

Plenary talk CyberWar is the continuation of politics by other means: interview of Stevan Bernard by Keren Elazari

CyberWar is the continuation of politics by other means

In this interview Stevan Bernard explained how the attack on Sony Pictures of november 2014 was handled. Here are the main points he shared:

  • Never underestimate your enemy.
  • Decisions made on Day 1 are the decisions that saved the company. This day was all about global and big decisions. This is when they decided to call the FBI and cyber security companies.
  • The human link is the weakest link: the attack started with spear phishing.
  • With twelve thousand employees all over the world, in such attack, you need to find alternative ways to communicate: Sony used old blackberry phones.
  • You can’t prepare enough: hire the right people, make the right decisions, get every one on the same page and define roles and responsibilities.

FraudCON 3.0

Stage of FraudCon 3.0

This event was a full day event. All along the day awards for « Legends of fraud fighting » were given and the winners shared their experience. I am going to present some talks of the day.

Limor Kessem, executive security advisor at IBM opened the day. She made an iventory of the last few years in terms of malwares and presented some of them. After her introduction different talks were given.

Ori Wainshtein: Thinking beyond traditional fraud

Ori Wainshtein is Head of Risk Research and Intelligence at Intuit. After a presentation of Intuit, he explained that in his opinion we need to be able to educate our children about this. He presented different aspects of fraud prevention and some scams. To conclude he gave key advices: Invest in customer safety, optimize for brand protection and develop holistic point of view on fraud.

Panel: news from the kingdom

Panel news from the kingdom

In this panel participants shared the lancaspe of UK in terms of fraud. Some figures were presented: reported fraud increased by 6% since 2009. Indentity fraud has been the biggest issue for a while and in 2018 it is more than ever, 85% of it is perpetrated online. They also tackled the issue of fraud detection and how to detect it.

Panel: tales from the colonies

Panel tales from the colonies

In this panel, they started to talk about mobile attacks saying that the minute something is patched, something new is out. Companies have to make things safer without changing too much the customer experience.

Nadav Katzenell: Remote overlay trojans attack and detection

Nadav Katzenell is head of ecurity researcher at IBM Security. In this talk he explained Remote overlay trojan attack. It is an attack that originated in Brazil and then quickly expended in South America and to new industries. Then he explained how his team set up a solution to detect this kind of attack.

Yehonatan Bar-Lev: The power of fusion center

Yehonatan Bar Lev is head of Cyber Center at the Bank Hapoalim. Yehonatan Bar Lev showed us the organization of a drug ring from the inside. What skills they have, how they work, how they hire staff and what type of attack they launch.

Mirko Manske: A sunday in hell

Mirko Manske is a federal criminal police officer in Germany. In this talk he explained how his team and him confronted an internet « provider from hell » to collaborate with them on a special case. He gave us an inside view of how german police and prosecutors work on such cases.

Panel ecommerce fraud, the next generation

Panel ecommerce fraud, the next generation

In this panel, Noa Kind started to explain what Ad Fraud is and how it was countered. Then, other persons from the panel explained how consulting works.

Karisse Hendrix: fighting online fraud is a lot like fighting zombies

Karisse Hendrick is an eCommerce Chargebacks & Fraud Consultant. In this talk she explained how online fraud evolved and her insights as a consultant. She also co-host a podcast that you can find in the « to go further » section.

Spencer McLain: Fighting fraud with collaboration

Spencer McLain is Vice President at Ekata. In this talk he first explained that online sales are increasing in order to tackle the authorization rate and fraud problem. He showed how fraud and solutions to fraud evolved, he gave a holistic approach to fraud prevention.

Sergey Shykevich: Even idiots can do fraud

Sergey Shykevich is cyber threat intelligence team manager at Q6 Cyber. In this talk, Sergey Shykevich explained that even with very basic knowledge anyone could do fraud. To prove his point he even showed an example.

Raymond King: Robbing the digital train

Raymond King is a product manager at TransferWise. In this talk, firstly he presented TransferWise. Then he explained to what kind of fraud TransferWise is confronted and the consequences it has and how they prevented them.

Ethan Ram: Fraudulent App installs

Ethan Ram is VP R&D at ZoomD. In this talk he explains what is App Install Fraud, how it works and how to fight it.

Panel: What’s new in marketplace fraud

Panel: What’s new in marketplace fraud

In this panel, they all shared their insights from their different companies. Firstly they shared the kind of fraud they are confronted to. Then they gave their opinions about machine learning and artificial intelligence to detect fraud. They talked about the collaborations they have with other platforms in the marketplace. Finally they shared some advice to fraud fighting teams.

To hapilly finish the day at FraudCon we did a fun little game in which we had to define if the case presented to us was « friendly fraud » or « true fraud ».

Conclusion

Learning expeditions are a really good way to learn. You get to see different things and discover the world at the same time. The CyberWeek was an awesome experience, i really enjoyed the talks and got to learn a lot. If you have the opportunity to go to the CyberWeek you definitely have to go to BSides TLV and FraudCon.

To go further

CyberHeroes week by Cyberworkplace

During my internship at Radically Open Security, i had the opportunity to help with the building of a CTF made for the CyberHeroes week of Cyberworkplace.
I found Cyberworkplace’s initiative so great that i asked if i could volunteer for the CyberHeroes week. They did not only accepted that i volunteered, but also invited me to come as a participant.

What is Cyberworkplace?

Cyberworkplace is a dutch initiative based in Rotterdam. It « is a non-profit initiative that helps reduce the current shortage of cyber security experts in the labor market and provides much-needed 21st-century skills to vulnerable young people (dropouts/ gamers/students, who lack practical experience in their study programs).
The training/lessons given at Cyberworkplace are inspired by modern teaching methods such as peer-to-peer techniques and project-based learning. » (source: https://cyberworkplace.tech/wat-is/)

What is CyberHeroes ?

« CyberHeroes is a one-week training program that brings together twenty talented youngsters from The Netherlands and New Mexico, USA. Together they will be trained in ethical hacking skills to address current security threats. Over the course of one week they will take on hacker battles, work on CSI-type cyber challenges with local police, study the history of cryptography, learn to fight cyber crime alongside international hackers, and much more. » (source: Cyberheroes booklet)

(source: Cyberheroes flickr)

What happened?

Day 1: Cryptography and Lockpicking

(source: cyberheroes booklet)

Philip Zimmerman made a great talk about cryptography and data protection.
He exposed the evolution of the Internet and the impact it had on privacy.

(source: cyberheroes booklet)

(source: Oscar Koeroo’s slides)

Oscar Koeroo started his workshop by a talk about his work at KPN and how they handled security.
On 2012 KPN got hacked, this year they decided to set up a Security Operation Center to handle better such incidents.
KPN CISO Strategy and policy is made available for everyone here
After this introduction, he started explaining cryptography concepts.
He then detailed RSA encryption.
Finally we practiced RSA encryption and encrypted with our own messages and numbers.
He mentioned a very good tool to help us for the assignments:
Wolframalpha.

(source: Cyberheroes flickr)

We ended the day with lockpicking, now i really want to buy my own lockpicking set! 😀 It reminded me of the video game called Skyrim, except it is much easier with a joystick^^

Day 2: CTF with Radically Open Security

(source: screen of the CTF platform made by Daan Spitz from Radically Open Security)

In the morning, Daan Spitz was introduced and the CTF started.
Daan works for Radically Open Security who sponsored the event and gave a CTF that he made.
In the afternoon, Melanie Rieback CEO of Radically Open Security was introduced she presented ROS and gave a great demo talk about cracking passwords.
We cracked the password « TreeHouse1234 » in less than 33 seconds!
Demo and slides can be found on ROS’s github.

(source: Cyberheroes flickr)

Day 3: On a boat with the dutch Police

(source: Cyberheroes flickr)

On day 3, we spent all day at the Seaport Police of Rotterdam.
We had the opportunity to meet Dirk-Jan Grootenboer, Peter Duin and other great police officers. They presented the Seaport Police and their work.
The Cyber Resilience unit has different goals:

  • Awareness of cyber threats and risks by citizens, corporations and other organisations
  • Know how to act: reactive, preventive, pro-active
  • Work together to share knowledge and new opportunities offered by technology
  • Resulting in continuous growth of cyber resiliency
  • From cyber security to cyber resilience
  • From reactive to pro active thinking and acting
  • Catching the advantages of cyber with an open eye for the risks

(source: Police officers talk)

Then, we had a CSI like challenge and a Police Patrol Boat Adventure. We were able to work on our social engineering skills and see the huge port of Rotterdam (largest in Europe).

On the afternoon, Floor Jansen and Marinus Boekelo joined us to present the Hack_Right initiative and explain the amazing take over of Hansa Market a dark web marketplace.
Hack Right is an initiative to help young hackers who commited a small crime, to get back in the right path and use their skills for ethical hacking.
It consists of 4 modules

  1. Restorative justice: if you commit a crime you break your connection with the victim to repair this boundary you have to do something for the community. In this module, cyber criminals are confronted with the damage and possibly even with the victims.
  2. Training: ethical and legal boundaries
  3. Coaching: personal connection between coach and offender. This involves providing longer guidance to the offender, linking them to someone from the community.
  4. Alternative: indicates the opportunities on the labour market and teaches young people where to develop their talents

(source: Floor Jansen’s talk and Mediawijzer’s article)

Day 4: Cybersprint at The Hague Security Delta and US Ambassador residence

In the morning, we worked on « Make it Smart » Maarten van Duivenbode introduced us to smart objects and how to use them. We were able to program lights and their colors.

In the afternoon, we visited Cybersprint at The Hague Security Delta.
Cynthia Schouten made an introductive talk and gave us a tour of the campus. We visited: Hogeschool Leiden’s IOT lab, we were introduced to a mixed reality tool that aims to train student in forensics with simulated crime scenes

(source: Cyberheroes flickr)

Then, we visited Splendo that introduced us their smart bikelock project for X-bike.

After the tour, Peter van Eijk who works at the municipality of the Hague presented the Hack Den Haag CTF. A CTF to help the city of the Hague to be more secure.
Finally, Soufian El Yadmani made an amazing talk about his adventure to cybersecurity. He explained that he was hired as a cybersecurity analyst at Cybersprint by winning a CTF. His team and him travel to many CTF competitions.
His secret to be a good ethical hacker? Practice, practice, practice!

After our visit to The Hague Security Delta Campus we went to the US Ambassador’s residence for a reception for the Cyberheroes program. There, Peter Hoekstra the Ambassador of the US, Anouk Vos from Cyberworkplace and Charles Ashley III from Cultivating Coders talked.
The Ambassador, is now a proud hacker in a beautiful Cyberworkplace hoodie and the owner of a CyberHeroes medal!

(source: Cyberheroes flickr)

Day 5 and 6: Trip to Leeuwarden, no escape possible 😀

(source: Cyberheroes flickr)

On the last two days of CyberHeroes, we were invited to Leeuwarden for a CTF at the amazing Hacklab.
Leeuwarden is a beautiful historical city in the north of Netherlands that has been European Capital of 2018.
The CTF gave us the opportunity to learn a lot.
After all this hacking we did we had to go to jail… joking we just spent the night in a former prison: Alibi Hostel


But before going to sleep, we took part in a great escape game made by Henk Van Ee founder of Cybersafety4u in which we had to unlock a hacker’s phone.

(source: Cyberheroes flickr)

To conclude this awesome week, we all got a certificate and a CyberHeroes medal.
Needless to way i was very proud to participate and help for this great adventure.
I would like to take the time to thank Radically Open Security (Melanie and Anh) without whom i would not have heard about Cyberworkplace.
Thanks also to Anouk, Nasya and Maria from Cyberworkplace that welcomed me for this week.
They all made an amazing work and i would definetely recommend everyone who has the opportunity to take part in a week like this.
Volunteer or help Cyberworkplace any way you can, they do such an amazing work for students and cybersecurity lovers.

(source: Cyberheroes flickr) Volunteers for the CyberHeroes week: Adelle, Anh, Maria, Anouk, Me, Nasya

To go further:

Engensec IT Security Summer School

(Article disponible en français plus bas)

To move forward in my challenge, I decided to attend a Summer School. That is how in july, i had the great opportunity to attend a European Program in Cybersecurity in the beautiful city of Lviv (Ukraine).
This program was held by the Lviv National Polytechnic University and the classes were organised in a beautiful annexe of the University.
view from the outside
entrance hall
corridor
Many students from different countries were attending this studious week: Ukraine, Sweden, Poland, Netherland, Luxembourg and France.

Presentation of the IT Security Summer School in the Lviv National Polytechnic University.

Why a Summer School ?

Well, a Summer School is a short and intensive way to gain skills quickly plus you get to meet people from all over the world.
Also, it seemed important to me to confront my knowledge with practical exercises in group to give an interactive dimension to my learning in self-training. Finally, being coached by cybersecurity experts during the summer school allowed me to consolidate the knowledge acquired during the previous months.

What did we learn ?

On the first day, we had a first assignment which was fun. We were given a list of teams named after malware. The goal was to find our team mates with the help of this list. It was a very good ice breaker to first meet attendees. To go further with the social interactions we also had a team quest to do in order to get to know each other better and discover the city.

The high quality courses were taught by professors from leading European universities such as Sweden, Poland and Ukraine.

The four main subjects discussed during the week

Malware Analysis

First, the history of ransomwares (first ransomware: AIDS trojan 1989) was discussed.
Then we reviewed different ransomwares: their encryption method, how they interact with the user and for some of them how to decrypt files.
The practical exercises allowed me to understand the necessary steps to analyze malware.
However, there is no single way or infallible method. This field requires great patience and perseverance to gain more experience.

Software Security

This course was about : Programming problems and buffer overflows, Defensive programming, Revision control systems and Good practices.

About the part « good practices », i wish i had such a course during my training as a programmer. Good practices in development for security is, in my opinion, a must known for every developer.

The lab about buffers was really helpful to better understand the buffer overflow error and how it can make a software very vulnerable. I had another Lab in which i had to manipulate and debug a program in order to find a password.

Web Security (including web app vulnerabilities)

Web security is quite an important piece in cybersecurity.
This class gave me an overview of the most common vulnerabilities on the web. With this course I was able to complete my list of tools and Websites related to Web security.

I really enjoyed the practical exercises because they were divided into several stages and allowed me to progress naturally according to the level of difficulty. More precisely during these exercises I tested the vulnerabilities during authentication, SQL injection, XSS vulnerabilities and ethical hacking.

Pentesting

This course gave a good overview of the duties of the pentester.
First we discussed several elements such as technical terms, the different types of hacker, pentesting tools and methodologies.
We also worked on the methodology to follow when writing a pentesting report.
Also, I learned the techniques of malicious hackers in order to propose a good defense strategy.

Finally, all the practical exercises allowed me to get use to the tools used during pentests, analyze vulnerabilities, test web applications and put social engineering methods into practice.

A step in the workforce

At the end of the fourth day two professionals came to share their experiences in the Security Operation Center of a Ukrainian business. They described their work and the issues they had to tackle every day.

This presentation gave us an inside point view of cybersecurity professionnals.

A place of culture and full of history

The City of Lviv

Lviv is a city in western Ukraine which was founded in the 13th century but has roots since the 6th century. Needless to say it is full of history.

Opéra House of Lviv Opera House of Lviv

You’ll have many opportunies to widen your culture:

  • Go to the Opera and see a beautiful piece
  • Visit beautiful churches
  • Just walk around in the streets of the old town
  • Eat and discover local gastronomy

The city tour

Engensec organized for us an amazing city tour with historic reconstitution and actors in costums in many corners of the city.
It was very a good break from the classes and a good entertainment.
sword fight
guided tour

Why you should attend Engensec?

– The organizers are very welcoming and helpful
– You get to have social interactions with people from all over the world
– If you want high quality classes for a great value this is totally the place to go
– You get a certification in the end of the week and ECTS for a total of 60 hours
certificate example

To go further


Pour avancer dans mon défi, j’ai décidé de suivre une summer school. C’est ainsi qu’en juillet, j’ai eu l’opportunité d’assister à un programme européen de cybersécurité dans la belle ville de Lviv (Ukraine).
Ce programme a été organisé par l’Université Polytechnique Nationale de Lviv et les cours avaient lieu dans une magnifique annexe de l’Université.

view from the outside
entrance hall
corridor

De nombreux étudiants de différents pays participaient à cette semaine studieuse : Ukraine, Suède, Pologne, Pays-Bas, Luxembourg et France.

Présentation de Engensec security summer school à l’Université polytechnique nationale de Lviv.

Pourquoi une summer school ?

Une summer school est un moyen court et intensif d’acquérir rapidement des compétences et de rencontrer des gens du monde entier. Aussi, il m’a semblé important de confronter mes connaissances à des travaux pratiques en groupe pour donner une dimension interactive à mon apprentissage en auto-formation. Enfin, être accompagné par des experts en cybersécurité pendant la summer school, m’a permis de consolider les connaissances acquises durant les mois précédents.

Qu’avons-nous appris ?

Le premier jour, nous avons eu un premier exercice assez amusant. On nous a donné une liste d’équipes portant le nom d’un logiciel malveillant. Le but était de trouver nos coéquipiers à l’aide de cette liste. C’était une très bonne façon de briser la glace. Pour aller plus loin dans les interactions sociales, nous avions aussi une quête à faire en équipe pour mieux se connaître et découvrir la ville.

Les cours de qualité étaient encadrés par des professeurs de grandes universités européennes telles que la Suède, la Pologne et l’Ukraine.

Les matières abordées dans la semaine

Malware Analysis

Dans ce module nous avons abordés l’historique des ransomwares (premier ransomware: AIDS trojan 1989).
Ensuite nous avons passé en revue différents ransomwares: leur méthode d’encryption, la façon dont ils se manifestent pour l’utilisateur et pour certains comment décrypter les fichiers.

Les exercices pratiques m’ont permis de comprendre les étapes nécessaires pour analyser un malware.
Pour autant, il n’existe pas une seule façon de faire ni une méthode infaillible. Ce domaine implique une grande patience et persévérance pour laisser place aux tâtonnements et à l’expérience.

Sécurité des logiciels

Dans ce cours nous avons abordé : les erreurs de programmation dont le buffer overflow, la programmation défensive, les systèmes de contrôle de révision et les bonnes pratiques en programmation.

En ce qui concerne la partie « bonnes pratiques », j’aurais aimé avoir un cours comme celui ci lors de ma formation de développeuse. Selon moi, il est indispensable de connaître ces bonnes pratiques afin d’être en mesure de livrer des logiciels sécurisés.

L’exercice pratique sur les buffer a été vraiment utile pour comprendre comment l’erreur buffer overflow peut rendre un logiciel très vulnérable. Dans un autre exercice, il fallait manipuler et débugger un programme afin de trouver un mot de passe.

Sécurité Web (dont vulnérabilités des applications Web)

La sécurité Web est un élément essentiel de la cybersécurité. Ce cours donne un aperçu des vulnérabilités les plus courantes sur le web.
Aussi grâce à ce cours j’ai pu compléter ma liste d’outils et de sites Web relatifs à la sécurité du Web.

J’ai beaucoup apprécié les exercices pratiques car ils étaient découpés en plusieurs étapes et permettaient de progresser naturellement en fonction du niveau de difficulté. Plus précisément lors de ces exercices j’ai testé les vulnérabilités lors d’authentification, l’injection SQL, les faille XSS et le hacking éthique.

Pentesting

Ce cours donnait un bon aperçu des missions qui incombent au pentester.
Tout d’abord nous avons abordé plusieurs éléments comme les termes techniques, les définitions des profils de hackers, les outils et les méthodologies du pentesting.
Nous avons également travaillé sur la méthodologie à respecter pour la rédaction d’un rapport de pentesting.
Aussi, j’ai pris connaissances des techniques de pirates malveillants afin de proposer une bonne stratégie de défense.

Enfin, tous les exercices pratiques m’ont permis de me familiariser avec les outils utilisés lors des pentests, d’analyser des vulnérabilités, de tester des applications web et de mettre en pratique des méthodes de social engineering.

Un aperçu des opportunités d’emploi

A la fin de la quatrième journée, deux professionnels sont venus partager leur expérience dans le Security Operation Center d’une entreprise ukrainienne. Ils ont décrit leur travail et les problèmes auxquels ils étaient confrontés au quotidien.

Cette présentation était intéressante pour avoir un point de vue de professionnels de la cybersécurité.

Un lieu de culture et plein d’histoire

La ville de Lviv

Lviv est une ville de l’ouest de l’Ukraine qui a été fondée au 13ème siècle mais qui a des racines depuis le 6ème siècle. C’est donc une ville pleine d’histoire.
Opéra House of Lviv Opera de Lviv

Ainsi, vous aurez de nombreuses occasions d’élargir votre culture :

  • Aller à l’Opéra et voir une belle pièce
  • Visiter de belles églises
  • Marcher dans les rues de la vieille ville
  • Découvrir la gastronomie locale

La visite de la ville

Engensec a organisé pour nous une visite avec une reconstitution historique faite par des acteurs en costumes dans de nombreux coins de la ville.
C’était une très bonne pause des cours et un bon divertissement.
sword fight
guided tour

Pourquoi vous devriez venir à Engensec?

– Les organisateurs sont très accueillants et serviables.
– Vous aurez des interactions sociales avec des gens du monde entier.
– Si vous voulez des cours de haute qualité pour un prix abordable, c’est l’endroit idéal.
– Vous obtenez une certification en fin de semaine et des ECTS pour un total de 60 heures.
– Le programme est ouvert à tous sans condition de niveau ou d’âge.

certificate example

Pour aller plus loin